Buckwheat, Bliny & More

Buckwheat

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) is used very much in Polish cookery as the plant grows well in a cold climate.  Buckwheat requires a well drained soil but without too much fertiliser  –  lots of fertiliser reduces the yield.  It is not in fact a grass or cereal crop but the flour is used in much the same way as wheat.

Buckwheat is related to sorrel and rhubarb and has small triangular seeds. The plant originated in South East Asia and then was brought to Europe.

I have read that it came to Poland via Manchuria and Siberia but the Polish word for buckwheat –  gryka indicates that it came from the Greeks – I have also read that the plant was brought to areas of what are now  Eastern Poland, Russia & the Ukraine in the 7th century by Byzantine Greeks. 

Another regional word used in Polish for buckwheat is hreczka – this again suggests a Greek origin.

Photographs from the book Kuchnia Polska by Maciej Kuroń

IMG_20160727_120344274 IMG_20160727_120326637

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The triangular seeds have a strong scent which is quite distinctive and the flour is grey/speckled black in colour.  It is mixed with wheat flour to make pancakes and bliny.

IMG_20160727_063737039

 

 

 

 

 

Bliny are popular in Eastern Poland and in the  area called Kresy – the Eastern Borderlands –  from where both my parents came as well as in the Ukraine and Russia.

The word bliny is plural – I doubt very much if the singular blin is much used!

Bliny are best cooked on a griddle or a cast iron frying pan.

Bliny are small risen pancakes made using yeast  they are  in the American style of pancake.

IMG_20160726_154754099_HDR

 

 

 

 

 

Bliny can be served warm or cold – I much prefer them warm!

Bliny

Ingredients

80g plain flour

80g buckwheat flour

1 egg

125 ml warm milk (full or semi-skimmed)

125 ml warm water

25g fresh yeast or 1 tablespoon of dried yeast

1 tablespoon of sugar

1 tablespoon of melted butter

Pinch of salt

Method

Put the yeast, sugar and milk in a bowl and leave to rise. (You can place this over bowl of warm water).

IMG_20160727_114311327
Wheat Flour & Buckwheat Flour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a large bowl mix the flours together and add yeast mixture and then the beaten egg.

Add the water bit by bit until the mixture is like pouring cream, you might not need it all.

Add the pinch of salt and the melted butter then cover with a cloth and leave to rise.

IMG_20160728_092149196 IMG_20160728_092344523 IMG_20160728_092333317 IMG_20160728_092512944 IMG_20160728_105025558 IMG_20160728_105042723

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160728_105901519_HDR IMG_20160728_105855880

 

 

 

 

 

Use the risen batter to make small pancakes by using 1 large tablespoon per pancake –  I make 3 or 4 at a time in my  lightly greased cast iron pan.

Once you get the pan hot, lower the heat to a steady low so as not to burn the bliny.

Once they are cooked on one side, turn then over using a spatula and cook for a few minutes more.

IMG_20160728_105937003

 

 

 

 

 

Serving suggestions

Serve the bliny with any of the following: melted butter, soured cream, twaróg, yoghurt cheese or cream cheese,  smoked salmon,  pickled herrings or even caviar,  gherkins, fried onions, skwarki (crispy bacon bits) fried mushrooms and one of my favourites a fried egg.

IMG_20160728_110728618
Served With Yoghurt Cheese and Chopped Parsley

IMG_20160728_110732377

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160728_110116268
Served with Melted Butter

 

 

Buckwheat Pancakes

These are thin pancakes and are also very popular in Northern France where they are called gallettes de sarrasin.

The French for buckwheat is  sarrasin or blé noir.

Many years ago whilst on holiday in France I bought and brought home a very large French pancake pan.

IMG_20160726_154736455

 

 

 

 

 

However on my gas stove it is too large for a good distribution of heat – you get a hot spot in the centre which tends to burn that part – so I use my smaller pancake pan.

IMG_20160726_154823589

 

 

 

 

 

Last week whilst in a department store in Leeds I saw the following – An Electric Crêpe Pan – It might be good.

IMG_20160730_123522083

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

75g buckwheat flour

25g plain flour

2 eggs

120ml of milk (full or semi-skimmed)

120ml of water

25g of  melted butter

pinch of salt

Some extra milk might be needed.

Method

Make these in the same way as standard pancakes adding the melted butter after the batter has been standing for about an hour.

I think these pancakes are best with savoury fillings and my favourite is in fact French in origin, Breton style with a slice of good ham, grated Gruyère cheese and a soft fried egg.

The fillings are put on the cooked pancake and the sides are folded over but with the filling still showing in the centre. (You can put this back on the pan to heat it a little more.)

IMG_20160727_125205566_HDR
Melted Butter & Grated Cheese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160727_125233017_HDR

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160727_130108334_HDR
Melted Butter, Grated Cheese & Fried Egg

IMG_20160727_130152531_HDR

Poffertjes

These mini buckwheat pancakes are Dutch in origin and it was only as I was trying out the recipes again that I realised how similar they are to bliny – but these are not served with savoury toppings but with icing sugar.

(The Dutch for buckwheat is boekweit)

Several decades ago when on a visit to The Netherlands I bought a special cast iron pan which is used for making poffertjes .

It was in the days before cheap flights & just hand luggage and  I had travelled there by car – not as easy to bring home without.

If you do not have access to the authentic pan  you can make them on a frying pan – my cast iron pan works very well.

 

IMG_20160726_154901789
Cast Iron Proffertje Pan with 19 Indentations

IMG_20160726_154754099_HDR

 

 

 

 

Poffertjes

Ingredients

10g dried yeast

1 teaspoon sugar

125g buckwheat flour

125 plain flour

Pinch of salt

1 egg

350ml of full fat or semi-skimmed milk – warmed slightly

1 tablespoon of  butter – melted

Icing sugar to serve.

Method

In a small bowl or jug dissolve the sugar, the yeast and around 50 ml of the milk.

Leave for around 10 minutes or so as  it froths up.

IMG_20160729_131108738

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160729_133101810

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a separate bowl, combine the  buckwheat and wheat flours, salt, egg, yeast mixture and half the remaining milk and mix well.

Now add the remaining milk  until the mixture is like double cream – you might not need all the milk.

Add the melted butter.

Cover the bowl and leave for around 1 hour until the mixture has bubbled and risen.

Lightly grease the pan and heat the pan – keep it the pan warm but not too hot or you will burn the poffertjes.

Using a teaspoon fill each indentation in the pan – you need around 2 teaspoons for each.

Turn the poffertjes around as soon as the bottom has set, using two forks.

IMG_20160729_155011830 IMG_20160729_155005608 IMG_20160729_155148766

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dredge the poffertjes with lots of icing sugar.

 

IMG_20160729_155323367 IMG_20160729_155326899 IMG_20160729_155335265

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160729_161532512_HDR
Using a Cast Iron Frying pan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160729_161517656_HDR

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160729_162716300 IMG_20160729_163631458 IMG_20160729_163635244

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canadian Alternative!

One of my friends who now lives in Canada brought me a large bottle of maple syrup on her last visit and I tried this over the poffertjes instead of the icing sugar – they were delicious.

IMG_20160729_161009545

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160729_161041541

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published by

jadwiga49hjk

I love cooking and baking. I love trying out new recipes and currently am trying out many old favourites from my Polish cookbooks and family recipes. I am trying out many variations, often to make them easier but still delicious. I collect glass cake stands and china tableware, mainly tea plates, jugs and serving dishes, many of which I use on a daily basis. They are an eclectic mixture from the 20th & 21st century.

5 thoughts on “Buckwheat, Bliny & More”

  1. I really enjoyed reading this post. Thank you. Can’t wait to try your bliny and other pancakes. I don’t bake much but I could certainly go for these pancake recipes. Lovely!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s